FLY TYING TUTORIALS OF SMOKY MOUNTAIN
TROUT FLIES

 

The Blue Winged Olive
                                              

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Introduction

The Blue Winged Olive fly is found in just about every stream. It is the essential food source for trout in the colder months of the year. I would like to focus on it at this time because it is the primary fly to be found on our best  tailwaters as well as mountain streams for the next three months. The versions that I will be showing for the tutorials will feature a new type of foam wing post that not only helps with visibility, but gives a little extra flotation in rougher water. You will see two different representations of color in this tutorial, so be sure to try them both. 

 Recipe

Hook: Mustad 94840 Dry Fly Hook
Thread: Bennecchi 14/0 Olive
Tail: Black Rooster Spade hackle
Wing Post: Foam Cylinders or other hi vis material
Abdomen: Olive tying thread  and Olive Superfine dubbing
Thorax: Same
Hackle: Whiting 100 black hackle 18-20

Step 1

Step 1

The second picture is to show two different versions of Hi Vis Foam that I have been using. Both have good flotation and visibilities. They are easy to tie in and do help with long cast when the light is low.

Step 2

Step 2

Place hook in the vise and wind in thread back to the hook bend. Leave thread hanging at this position.

Step 3

Step 3

Take a few black spade hackles and tie in at a 45% angle. Begin making turns to the front to cover all the barbs, then wind toward the hookbend. As you wind the final wraps, hold the barbs slightly and let the thread torque turn them evenly across the back of the hook bend. Now wind thread forward to the 2/3-3/4 point . This will be about two hookeye lengths back.

Step 4

Step 4

.Place foam cylinder on top of the hook and tie in. Make one soft wrap and then make a firmer one on the second turn. Make sure the foam is positioned correctly and continue to wrap back for 6-8 wraps. 

. Step 5

Step 5

Take the butt end of the foam with the thumb and forefinger and pull backwards causing the foam to stretch slightly. Take scissors and trim close to the last thread wraps.

Step 6

Step 6

Now wind thread backwards over the cut that was made, making close wraps to cover the foam and shape the body. Wind back to the hook bend and wind in Olive dubbing or just use thread wraps if you prefer. That is what I have done for simplicity in showing the tying process. Wind thread back to the front and lift up the wing post, making several wraps to hold the post upright. 

Step 7

Step 7

The wing post has been secured into the upright position and it is ready for some head cement to be applied around the base of it to give additional support.

Step 8

Step 8

Head cement is now applied to the base of the post on both sides.

Stage 9

Step 9

Tie in the hackle feather on the tiers side with 2-3 wraps behind and two or three in front of the wing post. Bring your thread to just behind the hookeye.

Step 10

Step 10

Hold hackle feather with your thumb and forefinger or hackle pliers. Make your first wrap slightly higher on the post. Now make subsequent wraps to go underneath the first one. Usually about 4 wraps are sufficient.

Step 11

Step 11

As you make the 4th wrap, bring it across the hookeye and pull down and back. As you can see in the picture, the thread has been resting just behind the hookeye. Take the thread and come underneath the hackle and over it. Do this 3 times while holding the hackle back and slightly down. 

Step 12

Step 12

Now to completely secure the hackle in place, hold back on the hackle feather, take the bobbin and wind around the hookeye with an up and down weaving motion that misses as much of the hackle barbs that point to the front. It is also a good idea to strip the hackle at about the  area that your hackle will be placed across the hook to be tied down. This eliminates a lot of trimming. Finish by tying the head down with whip finishing wraps and use head cement.

Step 13

Step 13

Here is the finished product and I think that you will find it an extremely good fly while your out fishing this winter. Good luck and good tying! 
About Us Articles Articles - Page 2 Advanced Nymph Fishing Classes Home
Dry Flies Nymphs and Emergers Nymphs and 
Emergers - Page 2
Wet Flies/Soft Hackle Flies Tailwater Trout Flies
Realistic Flies Tailwaters Hatch Charts Smoky Mountain 
Hatch Charts
Fly Tying Tutorials
Flycasting Lessons
Wet Flies/Soft
Hackle Classes
Reports Resources Bleached and Dyed
Starling Feathers
Inspiration
Gift Set
Top Tailwater Trout Flies
Gift Set
Top Smoky Mountain
Dry Flies
Gift Set
Top Smoky Mountain
Nymphs/Emergers
   

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