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Places to Grow Ginseng page 2

 

November 16, 2013 BRINGING THE GINSENG SEASON TO A CLOSE FOR 2013
We've come to the end of the season and all the work is finished that I had planned for my local patches. I have dug about 450 rootlets and replanted them in different locations to help thin out some spots that had plants that were too close together. After finishing that chore I raked about 120 bags of Poplar and Maple leaves from my yard and distributed them on all of the young plants that are now dormant so they will have lots of protection and food for next season. Numbers of dead limbs will be placed across the sloping areas to keep rain from washing the leaves away during the winter. I hope that  some of you that have been following the season this year will know a little more about growing ginseng and digging it when it is mature. Let's hope they have a good safe winter and please follow us next year as we pursue this beautiful , elusive plant.

We sold the ginseng that we dug this year and I was very pleased with the price that it brought.

  Hugh

OCTOBER 22, 2013 THE CHANGING SEASONS---GOING FROM THE GINSENG SEASON TO GROUSE HUNTING
The Grouse Hunting Season is under way and Boomer and I decided to try our luck in the mountains this morning. I thought that we might see some ginseng that had not gone down yet and that would give me a place to look for plants in the future. I took my camera with me just in case we saw some plants and it sure did not take long before we found some.  The plants are at their most beautiful stage at this time of the year and you will see them in the pictures at a beautiful golden color to a dull tannish brown when they are dissolving away. There were so many colors to see in the mountains today and it seemed like some sections were just on fire. I sure hate to see the season come to an end , but they will rest and come back strong next Spring. Visit with us again on this page or the Fishing Reports page for more reports.

   Hugh

OCTOBER 2, 2013 THE ENDING OF THE GINSENG SEASON IN THE CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST FOR 2013
The 2013 GINSENG DIGGING SEASON is over in the Cherokee National Forest. It has been a great experience for me and I wanted to show you some of the rewards that I was able to capture with the camera on the last day.  First, there is the beauty of the green, unharvested plants before they are dug. To me, this is one of the most beautiful plants in the forest.  Medicinally, it is the most sought after and valuable plant of the Appalachian Mountains. The red berries that you see on top of the plant are the correct way to keep this plant growing in decent numbers from year to year. I transplanted many dozens of these berries while I was hunting this Fall.

  The picture in the middle is one of several dried roots that are ready for the market. These roots were laid out on a drying board after being slightly cleaned when we finished the day. This is the finished product and sells for several hundred dollars per pound.

  The last two pictures are of a Man Root that I dug a few days ago. This is the type of root that can bring a hefty price from certain dealers and almost always goes to China. It is almost dry and if anyone sees this report and wants to buy this particular root, you can call me and I will have it certified by a dealer for instant sale. Please call 423-586-6198. This ginseng came from high in the mountains very close to the Great Smoky Mountains and right on the Tennessee- North Carolina border.

  I hope that you have enjoyed following our trips to the mountains and our quest for the "Green Gold of the Appalachians."

     Hugh

September 24. 2013 A LARGE ROOT TODAY THAT TURNED OUT TO BE A MAN ROOT
Well, today was a pretty good day and it produced the largest root that I have dug this season. Not only was it large, but it turned out to be a Man Root after I got it cleaned up. Many people in the ginseng world desire to find one of these rare roots which is shaped like a man's torso. Two legs, two arms, and the very manly part to go with it. I'll do a picture of it after it dries some. It is very well endowed. You can't tell very much about these qualities with mud all over it.

 I'm looking forward to doing a hunt in Kentucky with Billy Taylor on Thursday. Billy is the King of ginseng and he is a fabulous teacher, both online through his videos, as well as in the mountains where he takes guest occasionally. He has been hunting ginseng since he was a boy and now he is teaching his youngest, Caleb to carry on the tradition.

   Hugh

SEPTEMBER 23, 2013 AARON GETS HIS CHANCE TO LEARN HOW TO FIND AND DIG GINSENG
 
Carolyn's son Aaron picked up his permit this morning and had his first attempt at finding and digging ginseng in the mountains. Aaron is a police officer in Sevier County and we felt like we would not use any pictures of him personally on the report page. Carolyn is standing in for him as he digs a few plants. We took pictures of lots of plants , but many were just a little too small to dig this year and we left them. In 5 years when Cocke County becomes eligible again to dig in they will be very nice sized and we can look for them again. Aaron wound up getting 7 plants today and  we all had a great time.

Bear hunting fever is really taking over in the mountains of East Tennessee and we are seeing more dog training going on each time we go to the mountains to dig. It's a sight to behold when the dogs start hunting in earnest.

  Hugh

SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 THE THIRD DAY OF THE GINSENG SEASON IN THE CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST
Carolyn had another day off from work today and I was sure glad to have her with me again as we continue to try to fill our quota in the Cherokee National Forest. Twenty-five roots does not sound like much. but climbing around a 4000ft. mountain to find them can be a hard days work when you get past retirement age. It was quite chilly at the 4000ft level when we arrived this morning and Bear Season is about to start so there were already hunters there training their dogs. They had a bear going on top of the ridge above us and we wished them luck as the season approaches.

  This turned out to be the best day that we have had so far this year. We found 17 very nice plants and the largest one that I have ever seen and dug. It happened to be in a patch with about 5 others and we had to take our time to not injure any other plants nearby. I really got some good pictures of Carolyn and Boomer with the largest plant and I want you to look at the size of the stem and how tall it is while she is holding it up to her. We hope to continue our search as the week progresses on and maybe Carolyn will get another day to be with Boomer and me.

     Hugh

SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 OPENING DAY OF GINSENG SEASON IN THE CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST
Today is September 16, 2013 and it is the first day of ginseng season in the Cherokee National Forest. Carolyn, her son Aaron, and I, were drawn to be eligible to get a permit to hunt in the National Forest. This year is our first year ever to be able to dig ginseng to sell. We were excited about it as we got up early this morning and headed for the mountains of Cocke County. This is the only section of the northern Cherokee National Forest that is open to digging this year. We arrived just as it was getting daylight at the spot we chose to dig. This is a big steep mountain that goes up almost to the 5000ft. altitude and it was cool there as we got out of the car. In just a few minutes I had my first root out of the ground and I had replanted ripe berries close by. This sport, "activity" goes back to the time of Davy Crockett and may soon disappear from what has been a traditional way of making a supplemental living to many people in the Appalachians for 200 years.

I have been attempting for a few years to replant ginseng back into the forest all over East Tennessee and many of my young plants are getting close to the size and age that they will become a part of that 200 year old tradition. For the sake of the mountain people in East Tennessee, I hope the tradition never ends. It has helped to pay for many sets of clothes and shoes for school age children  for all of this past century and many families could still use a little help at the end of the year.

Since I had never dug or dried any before, it will help me to learn more about the skills that I might be able to pass on to another generation. You can see a few pictures that I took of a plant with ripe berries and another of a root that Carolyn dug with an exceptionally long feeder or tap  root at the bottom. This root was about 30 years old. We finished the day with several roots and we hope to be back in the mountains until we get our allotted 25 roots for this season.

 I hope to run into you on the mountain.

   Hugh

SEPTEMBER 12, 2013 COMING TO THE END OF GINSENG GROWING SEASON
We're coming down to the end of the 2013 ginseng season and I wanted to show you what I found today in the mountains while scouting. I looked at the  plantings that I made  2 years ago on private property and some older ginseng that I found this Summer in the Cherokee National Forest.  The young ginseng had grown very well and a few plants even had a few berries on them

You will see what I found later in the Cherokee National Forest that really gives ginsenging a bad name in these parts. Digging plants out of season or in the National Forest is illegal unless you have a permit. This year only 20 permits were given to dig and the season does not start until September 16th.  In the 3rd row of pictures you can see that someone has already dug plants before the season opened and that is called "poaching." They did not even try to replant the berries after digging the plants.

  You can see a few of the mature plants as well that have survived and it would be great if the Forest Service would let us plant more seeds. I look forward to next year and I hope that you follow along with us.

     Hugh

SEPTEMBER 2, 2013 2ND DAY OF GINSENG SEASON
Carolyn and I were back in the mountains again today and the plants that we found today were larger and all seemed to have many fine root hairs. I spent the morning showing her how to dig properly and she really made me proud of her as the day moved on. We had some very tough digging as we started off because of many, many roots and rocks. This is just what she needed to learn how to deal with all kinds of circumstances. Some of the nice plants that we found had green berries all over the pods so we left them and maybe a few more days will show us much riper berries. Almost all of the plants seemed to be at least 20 years old or older.  I'm really pleased with our first year of digging after planting so many for several years. The area that we are digging in is beautiful, but very steep. I hope that all ginseng diggers are having a great time.

  Hugh

SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 THE OPENING DAY OF GINSENG SEASON
Carolyn and I were up Sunday morning for our"first ever day" of actual ginseng digging. We made our way to some private property and in no time we were digging our first plants. We have grown and planted many thousands of ginseng berries and small rootlets , but this was our first time to ever dig any to sale. After several years of planting them in the mountains and private property it was a strange feeling to actually dig some and bring them home to dry. You can look at the foliage and see that this year has been a tough one for diseases that attack the leaves of the plants. This does not have any bearing to the roots and they will be just fine to dry. Carolyn was really echoing my sentiments when she said, "AFTER ALL THE TIME AND MONEY THAT WE HAVE SPENT GROWING AND PLANTING GINSENG WE ARE FINALLY GOING TO SEE SOME RETURN ON OUR INVESTMENT". We are hoping to go back to this area and hunt for many more days. We are also hoping that our names get drawn to dig in the Cherokee National Forest.

We met some fine folks from Florida while we were in this area who were vacationing from Florida. They were very nice to us and they had a special Black Lab with them who made quick friends with Boomer. We are hoping to get to spend time with them again. We hope to run into some of our flyfishing friends as well. Good luck to all of you ginseng diggers as we go into the 2013 season.

   Hugh

AUGUST 24, 2013 GINSENG DIGGING TIME IS FAST APPROACHING
On Saturday, the 24; I decided to make a trip to a location that I had found a lot of ginseng in last week. I was hoping to cover a larger swath of the mountain and this time, sure enough I found a lot of ginseng. It was pretty obvious after looking over many of the plants that this was a patch of ginseng that someone else had planted. I have not seen anyone else on either occasion that I have been there, but since I recognized that it had been planted I felt like I would treat their property just like I would want them to treat mine if they found it.
  The ginseng digging season opens on September 1st and I hope they take the tops out of the plants or there is a good possibility that they will lose it to poachers. That is a ginseng grower's nightmare. I should learn just after the 2nd of September whether my name was drawn to be able to get a permit to dig in the Cherokee National Forest. Ginseng planting time will also start at this time. If I get drawn it will be my first experience to dig ginseng to resell. I have found a lot of it this year and it has been an enjoyable time spent in the mountains. Keep following us for a video and more pictures for the rest of the season.

   Hugh

Here is a little update on how the berries are beginning to ripen. These are Wild Tennessee Ginseng plants and Wild Kentucky Ginseng plants. The Kentucky plants a 2-3 days behind in ripening every year.

 

     

JUNE 27, 2013 WATER IS TOO HIGH TO FISH SO AWAY TO THE MOUNTAINS I GO
We just can't get a break with the high water so Boomer and I took off to the high mountains again this morning to look for that elusive little plant that is called "Green Gold". It was so dark and overcast that we had a hard time seeing very well the whole time we were on the mountain. It is raining here at the house now as I write this story. The ginseng is growing a lot right now, but so are the other things in the forest. None the less, we found almost 100 plants this time and that may be a record for all of our trips to try to find this persnickety little booger. It just knows how to hide so well in amongst other plants. I took pictures of some of the nicer ones and maybe this will help you be able to identify ginseng plants when you're out in the mountains. Good luck finding your first one.

  Hugh

June 20, 2013 SOME REALLY NICE PATCHES OF GINSENG
Boomer and I were out and about today in the mountains and we found some exceptionally nice patches of ginseng. Carolyn and I had gone to the Lemon's Gap area a few days ago to look for some Elderberry bushes and  while we were walking back to the truck I saw a beautiful Flame Azalea bush that I took a couple of pictures of. They are my favorite flowering plant in the mountains. We are planning on making some Elderberry Preserves this Fall. I threw the pictures of the Azaleas in with the ginseng to add some beauty to the story. The ginseng was just as beautiful and hopefully we can spread some more of the seed if we get a permit this Fall to dig. This was some real nice mature plants and as you can see in the pictures , the deer are starting to browse them. Hopefully, I can get back and put some protection around them soon. You will notice in one of the pics that a very large top has been browsed to the point that the only thing left is the stem and berry pod. It was good to get out into the mountains today since the water is running on all of the tailwaters and it is too high on the mountain streams to wade. See you in the mountains.

  Hugh

MAY 26, 2013 MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND SCOUTING TRIP
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Boomer was anxious to get out and explore the mountains so we headed out to parts unknown. The heavy rains have caused so much growth that it is getting harder each time to distinguish ginseng plants from so many others that are growing right along side them. We hunted sections that we had not been on in some time and the results were moderately good. We went through a prescribed burn section that took place over a month ago and took pictures  so you can see what regrowth has taken place afterwards. Not much! We moved through that section and immediately began to find some plants. It felt good getting out in the mountains and the trips will probably slow down soon because it gets so hard to find during the mid parts of Summer. We're hoping to get in a fishing trip on Abrams Creek , so join us there in a few days.

  Hugh

MAY 19 , 2013 NICE MATURE GINSENG WITH SOME YOUNG PLANTS
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We were back in the mountains this morning finding some real nice ginseng. It is a good feeling to find some very nice 4 prong plants or lots of medium 3 prong types. It was a short hunt because of rain moving in, but we are accumulating a lot of nice pictures for the season. I hope you've had a chance to get out on some nice hiking trails and maybe even investigate some off trail searching. The flora and fauna are beautiful. We'll see you again in the woods.

   Hugh

MAY 15, 2013 GINSENG GROWING WILD IN THE DEEP MOUNTAINS
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Frank Ferrrill called yesterday and wanted to make a trip to the mountains to scout for ginseng. We had a very good trip together last year and I thought we could get an answer to whether the late cold spells had damaged any of the plants at high altitude. We arrived on the top of the mountain at about 9:00AM and began our trek to a distant place that we both have visited through the years. After walking about a Mile and one half we started up a deep hollow that had a branch running out of it. We found our first two prong plant quickly and then we had a long bare spell. Nothing sited. We had to move about 100yards further up the hollow before Frank found several nice three and four prongs. growing closely together. We photographed these plants and moved on higher. There came a point that we came to an old road bed and we followed it on it's upper side for a long way. We kept finding plants and getting higher in altitude all the time.   At one point I told Frank that we looked like we were at least 4500 feet high in altitude. The air was getting thinner and I could tell that I was tiring easily from all the climbing. We began to make our way off the mountain , back to the old road bed that we had come in on. We had found and photographed quite a few plants to make it a very nice outing. By the time we reached the truck we were both exhausted from the climbs and high altitude. It was a great hunt and I hope you enjoyed the time we shared with you.

  Hugh 

MAY 13, 2013 CHECKING OUT SOME PLANTED AND SOME WILD GINSENG IN THE MOUNTAINS
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Today, Boomer and I looked over some remote patches of ginseng that have been around for several years. Everything seems to be growing well and I am thankful for the abundance of rain that we have had. Most of these plants are growing in spots that have good drainage so they seem to be happy with the extra water. I also found a couple of small American Chestnut Sprouts growing so I photographed them while I was close. The wild plants were mostly 3 Prongs and I have photographed them before. I look forward to seeing them set on nice berry pods and later seeing the beautiful scarlet fruit as they ripen. This is the time that I think they are the most beautiful plants in the woods. I'll try to keep pictures coming as the season progresses.

   Hugh

MAY 3, 2013 TAKING A LOOK AT THE GINSENG AT HIGH ELEVATIONS
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Today was the day to check out the ginseng growing at the highest elevations. I wasn't absolutely sure that it would be up yet and I don't believe that all of it has come up at the moment. I took pictures so that you can see what wild Tennessee Ginseng looks like. I am really having fun doing this in the mountains and I find more new plants every time that I get to search out likely spots. It is a beautiful time with all the forest plants erupting as the weather warms up. I came across an old remnant of a time past and I wish that I could see this tree completely restored in my lifetime. The picture that I took is of an old American Chestnut stump that is about 5-6 feet in diameter. It was a giant of the forest in it's time. It was probably about 200-250 years old at the time that it was cut and it most likely was cut about 100 years ago. As you can see the stump still has not completely rotted. I hope you are enjoying taking these little trips with me and learning about ginseng. Drop in and visit with us again here or on the Fishing Reports Page.

  Hugh

MAY 2, 2013 LOOKING AT GINSENG THAT'S PLANTED AND WALKING THROUGH PANTHER CREEK STATE PARK
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Today I did a walk over some of my Ginseng Plants and I then drove to Panther Creek State Park. I had seen some good patches of Golden Seal "Yellowroot" there last year, so I wanted to get some pictures of this good medicinal herb. I don't know how this much survived before it was turned into a State Park. These are really nice patches. Enjoy how the plants are progressing as Spring moves along.

  Hugh

APRIL 27, 2013 OUT AND ABOUT LOOKING AT THE GINSENG PATCHES
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We were out in the rain today checking on several different patches. The woodland flowers are coming on strong and their beauty is something to behold as they show their colors and their delicacy at the beginning of Spring in East Tennessee. You can see from the pictures that ginseng is emerging and growing at a good pace. We are having an unusual amount of rainfall this year and it just adds to the majesty of the woodland flowers as you walk or drive through the forest. I hope that you get a chance to get out and walk or drive soon.

  Hugh 

April 15, 2013 PICTURES SHOWING HOW THE GINSENG IS ADVANCING ALONG DURING THE EMERGENCE STAGE
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I thought that it would be interesting to see just how things are advancing along here in East Tennessee and maybe give others that are farther North a little enticement until their seng is up. I particularly wanted to show everyone how many three leafers are emerging . These are plants that have been in the ground for two years and have just emerged for the first time. They were held back by Delayed Germination due to being placed in too cold of a refrigerator while I was planting on different days. I'm sure that I have lost some plants overall, but there are hundreds and hundreds that did survive. All in all, I want to make everyone aware what can happen from placing seeds in a refrigerator  that is too cold.

 I'm also beginning to get larger plants that are coming up and maybe in a few days I will see the Wild Kentucky seng and the Wild Tennessee sang. I'm looking forward to seeing my first 4 prongs on plants that I started from seed.

Good luck to everyone who is growing.

   Hugh

APRIL 2, 2013 PICTURES OF THE FIRST GINSENG PLANTS COMING UP IN 2013
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Today is the 2nd of April, 2013 and I began to find the first ginseng plants and some May Apple shoving through the leaf litter. I'm a little skeptical right at the moment because we are still having freezing temperatures at night. I took bags of leaves that I had gathered in the Fall and tried to cover the plants lightly to give a little protection until we are past these last few frosty nights. It will probably take all the rest of the month of April for the remainder of the young plants to emerge. I'm hoping it is going to be a great growing season since the ground is completely saturated as we start the season for a new year. It's going to warm up for the next several days and we should see lots of plants emerging. I'll be placing more pictures on the website as things progress.

  Hugh

JANUARY 6, 2013 PICTURES FROM THIS FALL SEASON ON THE MOUNTAIN
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Late this week I met , by accident, a fellow from Morristown who hikes and does some photography work to supplement his income. When he found out where I grew up he asked me if I knew about the Falls in these pictures. I told him I was familiar with them and I had been in the general area quite a bit this Fall. He was kind enough to allow me to use the pictures on my website and I thought that you fellows would appreciate the beauty of the area through his photography. His name is Dale Testerman and I want to thank him for allowing us to see his professional work. 

Hugh

NOVEMBER  18, 2012 ONE ACRE OF GINSENG PATCHES WITH SPOTS FILLED IN AND READY TO REST FOR THE WINTER
All of the necessary additions have been made on this plot at my house and they are ready for Spring applications of needed fertilizer recommendations, come March. If you look closely you can see some flags where I added rows Wild Tennessee Ginseng rootlets. I'm sure that everyone is anxious to get to the end of the planting season. I'm now looking forward to April the 16-18th of 2013.

  Hugh

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NOVEMBER 3, 2012 PLANTING GINSENG ROOTLETS
This is a method of planting ginseng rootlets that I hope will help to loosen the soil and get nutrients down deep so that good early growth can be attained as well as a better percentage of plants making it in the Spring. It can also be used to get much quicker results from diggable sized roots.
OCTOBER 25, 2012 A FEW OF THE PLACES WE HAVE VISITED IN THE LAST TWO WEEKS
This is a few shots that I took as we drove through ginseng country. You can see how fast the season has changed and how beautiful it has become at the mid and higher altitudes. The first picture is a shot taken one day when heavy weather was in the area. We stopped right at the cloud line and had a snack. The visibility was down to a few feet. Just shortly after that trip it was clear and things were still green. Look at how the colors advanced in a weeks time. The last picture is of a nice brown trout from the South Holston River that I caught this morning. I hope that you enjoy the scenery of East Tennessee.

  Hugh

OCTOBER 4, 2012 PRETTY GOOD LATE SEASON TRIP TO THE MOUNTAINS
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I had a chance to take a last of the season trip with Frank Ferrrill, from Jefferson City. We made our way to the mountains to some places that he had hunted before and that I had scouted from the road. It did not take long to start finding ginseng. You can tell by the looks of most of it that the season will be over by the end of the week in most sections. We found a few nice 4 prongs and some that were a little smaller.  We gave this seng our approval and wished it a good winter. I hope to see it again next season.

  Hugh

SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 WILD GINSENG IN THE CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST
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JUNE 23, 2012 LOOKING AT PROPERTY CLOSE TO THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK
I took my wife and Boomer out Sunday to see the area where my Great Grand Parents lived and where my roots began in the mountains. My Great Grandfather was an original settler in the Cosby area of Cocke County. He was pure Irish and his wife was a Cherokee Indian Princess. Many people in that area married Indians at that time. I had originally wanted to see if I could find another person who grows ginseng in the area, but I could not find him. We saw a couple of signs of property for sale and it made me wonder if I could get a few acres in this area just to grown ginseng on. It is a very steep mountainous section and at a pretty high altitude. The mountain is over 5000ft. high and the boundary between private land and Park land is at about  3500=4000ft in altitude. You can see the road we traveled for awhile that divides the Park line. Everything is green and lush up there and hot as blazes here at my home in the Valley. I threw in a picture of a young man that I guided a few days ago who had just caught his first Smokies rainbow.

  Hugh

JUNE 16, 2012 LATEST SOIL TEST REPORT
This is the latest soil test report that I received today (6/16/12). I am somewhat surprised with the results and I don't really know what to make of it.  This the richest piece of soil that I know of and it tested much farther from the optimum range for ginseng than the soil at my house. The Phosphorus and Calcium readings were quite a bit lower than the soil at home. It does have a better PH range than my home soil does and it is at least a Thousand feet higher in elevation than my house. You can see in the pictures below that it is growing fairly decent ginseng. Do you guys have any thoughts?

  Hugh  

JUNE 11, 2012 BOOMER, THE GINSENG POINTING DOG
   
I took Boomer with me today to look over certain spots that I have planted and to see if we could find any wild plants growing nearby. Boomer is getting better each and every time. Here are the results of about 4-5 hours in the mountains. I love my ginseng pointing dog.

  Hugh

May 25, 2012 SOIL SURVEY TEST
May 23, 2012 LATE EMERGING GINSENG SEEDLINGS
I thought that these pictures would be interesting to see since I have been telling you guys how the seedlings have been continuing to come up for two months. It rained last night and some the day before so I figured that I would see more new babies this morning. It did not take me two minutes to snap these and you can see that several have just emerged this morning and started life kind of late in the Spring. I'm sure that if I could see how many have come up it would be in the hundreds. I just don't know what to say about all this late emergence , but the smile gets bigger on my face every time that I count more new ones.

  Hugh

MAY 12, 2012 LAST EARLY SUMMER TRIP TO CHECK NEWLY EMERGING GINSENG PLANTS
These three pictures are made from plantings in the mountains on 5/12/12 and they show just how well the ginseng germinated when first opened and planted. After a day or two in the refrigerator the emerging plants became less and less. By the time a few days had passed and the seeds had become chilled, it became hard to find any plants even though they had been planted the same way. I hope this gives some insight as to how this might affect placing seeds in too cold of an environment. I will be looking at these plantings next spring to see if any new plants emerge.

  Hugh

APRIL 29, 2012 CHECKING ON NEWLY EMERGING GINSENG AND FLYFISHING  NEARBY WATERS
I wanted to check on a spot that I had tried to dig a wilted ginseng plant that broke into, very late in the season last year. I planted pretty heavily there in the late Fall and this was the first opportunity that I've had to see how the newly emerging plants were doing. I had not been looking more than 6-8 minutes when I found these nice plants. These are the first wild ones that I've found this year.

  Hugh

 
 
 

 

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